What Exactly Does A Workers' Compensation Attorney Do?

Workers' compensation regulations allow injured workers to receive a variety of benefits, depending on the nature of the damage.

Accidents happen at work all the time—a broken arm from falling off a ladder, a back injury from moving large boxes, or carpal tunnel syndrome from years of typing are just a few instances. Workers who are injured on the job can seek compensation for their injuries, including medical costs and lost earnings, through a worker compensation lawyer.

Benefits that are available


Workers' compensation regulations allow injured workers to receive a variety of benefits, depending on the nature of the damage. They may include the following:

  • Benefits for complete and permanent disability
  • Benefits for permanent partial disability
  • Benefits for temporary partial disability
  • Medical assistance is available.
  • Benefits for wage reimbursement
  • Benefits of vocational rehabilitation
  • Laws Regarding Workers' Compensation


Each state's legislation as well as federal statutes govern workers' compensation rules. In the event of work-related accidents or diseases, both allow for fixed payouts to employees or their dependents.

These statutorily mandated awards allow an injured worker to collect compensation without having to file a lawsuit against his or her employer. The types of workers covered, the quantity and length of benefits, and other specifics varies between state acts.

The Federal Employees Compensation Act, the Jones Act for sailors, and the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act for longshore and harbour workers all apply to federal employees.

Most workers' compensation laws hold the employer absolutely accountable for injuries received while on the job, regardless of whether the employer or the employee was negligent. To be valid, an injury must occur in the course and scope of employment, and an employee-employer relationship must exist.